Arcology

January 31, 2009

Arcology – n. an ideal city contained within a massive vertical structure, allowing maximum conservation of its environment.  

ORIGIN 1969: blend of Architecture and Ecology

So this is another word that I’m including because of its connection to a video game arcologyI used to play as a youth.  An arcology, you may remember, was the pinnacle of development in the game SimCity 2000.  It was always pretty satisfying when you finally reached the point where you could build one in your city.  Even more satisfying if you managed to get to that point without cheating.

SimCity aside, there is a lot of interesting information on the  web about arcologies.  Do check out the wikipedia entry on it.  

Many search results referred to Arcosanti, a modern arcology project in Arizona that is currently under construction.  Check out the link for much more information on the project.  It seems like a very interesting undertaking.

arcosanti

Arcosanti

Arborescent

January 6, 2009

Arborescent – adj. tree-like.

Just a nice, simple one today.  For all you writers out there, this is a good one to add to your vocab.  And it sounds cool; it’s along the same lines as Will Ferrell’s scrumtrulescent.  Enjoy.

A tree.

A tree.

 

Tree-like.

Tree-like.

 

 

 

 

Also, Arborescent is a company that markets dendrimers.  When you’re in need of a good dendrimer, you know where to look.

Araucaria

January 5, 2009

Araucaria – n. an evergreen conifer with stiff sharp leaves, eg. the monkey puzzle.

 

Young Monkey Puzzle tree

Young Monkey Puzzle tree

I normally don’t include words on this blog that are names of plants or animals, mostly because they’re not that interesting and unless you’re a botanist or zoologist, you’ll never get to use them.  But today’s word brought back some memories for me and taught me something new.  

As a child, I lived in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada and there I would occasionally see what are called Monkey Puzzle trees (araucaria araucana) and I was utterly fascinated by them.  They are not native to Canada but are often used as ornamental trees.  My parents explained that they were called Monkey Puzzle trees because a monkey would never be able to climb one because of its sharp leaves.  I also just discovered that araucaria araucana is the national tree of Chile.  Kinda neat.  Hope you think so, too.

Mature Monkey Puzzle tree

Mature Monkey Puzzle tree

Monkey Puzzle tree leaves

Monkey Puzzle tree leaves